Fedegoso Herb Powder - Cassia occidentalis Fedegoso Powder

Cassia occidentalis

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The Cassia plants are well known for a group of chemicals with strong laxative actions called anthraquinones. The most widely used species of Cassia in herbal medicine is known as senna (Cassia senna or C. acutifolia). The actions of the anthraquinones chemicals are the basis of senna's widespread use as a purgative and strong laxative.* While fedegoso leaves do contain a small amount of these anthraquinones, it was shown in animal studies not to have the same strong purgative and laxative effects as fedegoso seeds or senna.* For more information about fedegoso (Cassia occidentalis), please refer to the Database File for Fedegoso in the Tropical Plant Database. To see pictures of fedegoso, click here. Check out the new Discussion Forums to see if anyone is talking about how they are using this natural rainforest remedy.

Traditional Uses:* as a broad-spectrum internal and external antimicrobial to treat bacterial and fungal infections; for liver disorders (jaundice, hepatitis, cirrhosis, anemia, detoxification, injury/failure, bile stimulant, etc.); for intestinal worms, internal parasites, skin parasites; as an immune stimulant; as a cellular protector and a preventative to cell damage (immune, liver, kidney, cancer preventative)

Suggested Use: This plant is best prepared as an infusion (tea): Use one teaspoon of powder for each cup of water. Pour boiling water over herb in cup and allow to steep 10 minutes. Strain tea (or allow settled powder to remain in the bottom of cup) and drink warm. It is traditionally taken in 1 cup dosages, twice daily. For more complete instructions on preparing herbal infusions see the Methods for Preparing Herbal Remedies Page.

Contraindications: Fedegoso leaf extracts have demonstrated weak uterine stimulant activity and smooth-muscle relaxant actions in rats. As such, the use of this plant is contraindicated during pregnancy.

Drug Interactions: Fedegoso has demonstrated significant liver protective, tonic, and detoxifing effects in animal and human studies. As such, fedegoso may speed the clearance (or reduce the half-life) of some drugs that require metabolization in the liver.

Other Observations: Fedegoso has demonstrated hypotensive activity in animal studies. People with low blood pressure should use with caution and monitor their blood pressure levels for this possible effect.





Third-Party Published Research*

All available third-party research on fedegoso can be found at PubMed. A partial listing of the third-party published research on fedegoso is shown below:

Antimicrobial Actions:
Bhagat, M., et al. "Evaluation of Cassia occidentalis for in vitro cytotoxicity against human cancer cell lines and antibacterial activity." Indian J Pharmacol. 2010 Aug;42(4):234-7.
Li, S., et al. "Cycloartane triterpenoids from Cassia occidentalis." Planta Med. 2012 May;78(8):821-7.
Evans CE, et al. “Efficacy of some nupe medicinal plants against Salmonella typhi: an in vitro study.” J. Ethnopharmacol. 2002 Apr; 80(1): 21-4.
Samy, R. P., et al. “Antibacterial activity of some folklore medicinal plants used by tribals in Western Ghats of India.” J. Ethnopharmacol. 2000; 69(1): 63–71.
Anesini, C., et al. “Screening of plants used in Argentine folk medicine for antimicrobial activity.” J. Ethnopharmacol. 1993; 39(2): 119–28.
Caceres, A., et al. “Plants used in Guatemala for the treatment of dermatophytic infections. 1. Screening for antimycotic activity of 44 plant extracts.” J. Ethnopharmacol. 1991; 31(3): 263–76.
Hussain, H., et al. “Plants in Kano ethomedicine: screening for antimicrobial activity and alkaloids.” Int. J. Pharmacog. 1991; 29(1): 51–6.
Gaind, K. N., et al. “Antibiotic activity of Cassia occidentalis.” Indian J. Pharmacy 1966; 28(9): 248–50.

Immunostimulant Actions:
Bin-Hafeez, B., et al. “Protective effect of Cassia occidentalis L. on cyclophosphamide-induced suppression of humoral immunity in mice.” J. Ethnopharmacol. 2001; 75(1): 13–18.

Antioxidant Actions:
Arya, V., et al. "Antioxidant activity of organic and aqueous leaf extracts of Cassia occidentalis L. in relation to their phenolic content." Nat Prod Res. 2011 Sep;25(15):1473-9.
El-Hashash M., et al. "Antioxidant properties of methanolic extracts of the leaves of seven Egyptian Cassia species." Acta Pharm. 2010 Sep;60(3):361-7.
Sreejith, G., et al. "Anti-allergic, anti-inflammatory and anti-lipidperoxidant effects of Cassia occidentalis Linn." Indian J Exp Biol. 2010 May;48(5):494-8.

Liver Protective & Detoxification Actions:
Yadav, J., et al. "Cassia occidentalis L.: a review on its ethnobotany, phytochemical and pharmacological profile." Fitoterapia. 2010 Jun;81(4):223-30.
Jafri, M. A., et al. “Hepatoprotective activity of leaves of Cassia occidentalis against paracetamol and ethyl alcohol intoxication in rats.” J. Ethnopharmacol. 1999; 66(3): 355–61.
Sharma, N., et al. “Protective effect of Cassia occidentalis extract on chemical-induced chromosomal aberrations in mice.” Drug Chem. Toxicol. 1999; 22(4): 643–53.
Saraf, S., et al. “Antiheptatotoxic activity of Cassia occidentalis.” Int. J. Pharmacog. 1994; 32(2): 178–83.
Subbarao, V. V., et al. “Changes in serum transaminases due to hepatotoxicity and the role of an indigenous hepatotonic, LIV-52.” Probe 1978; 17(2): 175–78.
Sethi, J. P., et al. “Clinical management of severe acute hepatic failure with special reference to LIV-52 in therapy.” Probe 1978; 17(2): 155–58.
Sama, S., et al. “Efficacy of an indigenous compound preparation (LIV-52) in acute viral hepatitis—A double blind study.” Indian J. Med. Res. 1976; 64: 738.

Skin Repigmentation Actions (Vitiligo):
Babitha, S., et al. "A stimulatory effect of Cassia occidentalis on melanoblast differentiation and migration." Arch Dermatol Res. 2011 Apr;303(3):211-6.

Antidiabetic Actions:
Verma, L., et al. "Antidiabetic activity of Cassia occidentalis (Linn) in normal and alloxan-induced diabetic rats." Indian J Pharmacol. 2010 Aug;42(4):224-8.
Verma, L., et al. "Effect of ethanolic extract of Cassia occidentalis Linn. for the management of alloxan-induced diabetic rats." Pharmacognosy Res. 2010 May;2(3):132-7.

Antimutagenic (cancer preventative) and Anticancerous Actions:
Bhagat, M., et al. "Evaluation of Cassia occidentalis for in vitro cytotoxicity against human cancer cell lines and antibacterial activity." Indian J Pharmacol. 2010 Aug;42(4):234-7.
Yadav, J., et al. "Cassia occidentalis L.: a review on its ethnobotany, phytochemical and pharmacological profile." Fitoterapia. 2010 Jun;81(4):223-30.
Bin-Hafeez, B., et al. “Protective effect of Cassia occidentalis L. on cyclophosphamide-induced suppression of humoral immunity in mice.” J. Ethnopharmacol. 2001; 75(1): 13–18.
Sharma, N., et al. “In vitro inhibition of carcinogen-induced mutagenicity by Cassia occidentalis and Emblica officinalis.” Drug Chem. Toxicol. 2000; 23(3): 477–84.
Sharma, N., et al. “Protective effect of Cassia occidentalis extract on chemical-induced chromosomal aberrations in mice.” Drug Chem. Toxicol. 1999; 22(4): 643–53.

Laxative Actions:
Elujoba, A., et al. “Chemical and biological analyses of Nigerian Cassia species for laxative activity.” J. Pharm. Biomed. Anal. 1989; 7(12): 1453–57.

Anti-inflammatory, Muscle Relaxant & Antispasmodic Actions:
Iriť-N'guessan, G., et al. "Tracheal relaxation of five Ivorian anti-asthmatic plants: role of epithelium and K^(+) channels in the effect of the aqueous-alcoholic extract of Dichrostachys cinerea root bark." J Ethnopharmacol. 2011 Nov 18;138(2):432-8.
Sreejith, G., et al. "Anti-allergic, anti-inflammatory and anti-lipidperoxidant effects of Cassia occidentalis Linn." Indian J Exp Biol. 2010 May;48(5):494-8.
Sadique, J., et al. “Biochemical modes of action of Cassia occidentalis and Cardiospermum halicacabum in inflammation.” J. Ethnopharmacol. 1987; 19(2): 201–12.
Feng, P., et al. “Pharmacological screening of some West Indian medicinal plants.” J. Pharm. Pharmacol. 1962; 14: 556–61.

Antimalarial, Antiparasitic & Insecticidal Actions:
Panneerselvam, C., et al. "Adulticidal, repellent, and ovicidal properties of indigenous plant extracts against the malarial vector, Anopheles stephensi (Diptera: Culicidae)." Parasitol Res. 2012 Nov 29.
Kumar, S., et al. "Evaluation of 15 Local Plant Species as Larvicidal Agents Against an Indian Strain of Dengue Fever Mosquito, Aedes aegypti L. (Diptera: Culicidae)." Front Physiol. 2012;3:104.
Kundu, S., et al. "In vitro screening for cestocidal activity of three species of Cassia plants against the tapeworm Raillietina tetragona." J Helminthol. 2012 Mar 20:1-6.
Equale, T., et al. "In vitro anthelmintic activity of crude extracts of five medicinal plants against egg-hatching and larval development of Haemonchus contortus." J Ethnopharmacol. 2011 Sep 1;137(1):108-13.
Ibrahim, M., et al. "Senna occidentalis leaf extract possesses antitrypanosomal activity and ameliorates the trypanosome-induced anemia and organ damage." Pharmacognosy Res. 2010 May;2(3):175-80.
Tona, L., et al. “In vitro antiplasmodial activity of extracts and fractions from seven medicinal plants used in the Democratic Republic of Congo.” J. Ethnopharmacol. 2004 Jul; 93(1): 27-32.
Tona, L., et al. “In-vivo antimalarial activity of Cassia occidentalis, Morinda morindoides and Phyllanthus niruri.” Ann. Trop. Med. Parasitol. 2001; 95(1): 47–57.
Gasquet, M., et al. “Evaluation in vitro and in vivo of a traditional antimalarial, ‘Malarial 5.’” Fitoterapia 1993; 64(5): 423.
Schmeda-Hirschmann, G., et al. “A screening method for natural products on triatomine bugs.” Phytother. Res. 1989; 6(2): 68–73.

Non-Toxic Actions:
Silva, M., et al. "Acute and subacute toxicity of Cassia occidentalis L. stem and leaf in Wistar rats." J Ethnopharmacol. 2011 Jun 22;136(2):341-6.
Yadav, J., et al. "Cassia occidentalis L.: a review on its ethnobotany, phytochemical and pharmacological profile." Fitoterapia. 2010 Jun;81(4):223-30.

Toxic Actions in Pregnancy:
Arag„o, T., et al., "Toxicological reproductive study of Cassia occidentalis L. in female Wistar rats." J Ethnopharmacol. 2009 May 4;123(1):163-6.


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by the Food and Drug Administration. This product is
not intended to treat, cure, mitigate or prevent any disease.
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Last updated 12-27-2012