Huacapu bark powder (Minquartia guianensis) in 1 pound packages - Huacapu  (Minquartia guianensis) - Huacapu  (Minquartia guianensis) Huacapu Powder

Minquartia guianensis

This product is no longer sold by Raintree Nutrition, Inc. See the main product page for more information why. Try doing a google search or see the rainforest products page to find other companies selling rainforest herbal supplements or rainforest plants if you want to make this rainforest formula yourself.

Huacapu bark contains triterpenes, xanthones, lipids, tannins, and acids. The main bioactive chemical in the bark is a lipid called minquartynoic acid. This plant chemical has been the subject of research and various scientists have reported that it is cytotoxic to a large diverse line of cancer cells including human lung cancer cell lines, ovarian, colon, and neuroblastoma cancer cell lines.* Another research group reported it passed the initial screening test for antitumor activity as well as demonstrated actions against the malaria and leishmania parasites.* A research group reported in 2000 that minquartynoic acid demonstrated effective antiviral actions against the HIV virus at as little as 2.2 mcg/ml which might explain why the tree bark has been so popularly used for other viruses like hepatitis and herpes.*

For more information about huacapu (Minquartia guianensis), please refer to the Database File for Huacapu in the Tropical Plant Database. More information can also be found in the new Antimicrobial Guide. To see photographs of huacapu click here. Check out the new Discussion Forums to see if anyone is talking about how they are using this natural rainforest remedy. More information on huacapu can also be found the in the new Anti-Cancerous Guide

Traditional Uses:* for viral infections (herpes, hepatitis, etc.); for cancer; for intestinal parasites and worms; as a pain-reliever for rheumatism, arthritis and other muscular pains; as an antiseptic wound healer

Suggested Use: This plant is best prepared as a decoction. Use one teaspoon of powder for each cup of water. Bring to a boil and gently boil in a covered pot for 20 minutes. Allow to cool and settle for 10 minutes and strain warm liquid into a cup (leaving the settled powder in the bottom of the pan). It is traditionally taken in 1/2 cup dosages twice daily. For more complete instructions on preparing herbal decoctions see the Methods for Preparing Herbal Remedies Page.

Contraindications: None reported. Large dosages are reported to have a laxative or purgative effect.

Drug Interactions: None reported.





Third-Party Published Research*

All available third-party research on huacapu can be found at PubMed. A partial listing of the published research on huacapu is shown below:

Cytotoxic & Antitumoral Actions:
Huacapu bark contains triterpenes, xanthones, lipids, tannins, and acids. The main bioactive chemical in the bark is a lipid called minquartynoic acid. This plant chemical has been the subject of research and various scientists have reported that it is cytotoxic to a large diverse line of cancer cells including human lung cancer cell lines, ovarian, colon, and neuroblastoma cancer cell lines. Researchers in the United States first reported in 1988 and 1989 that a water extract of huacapu bark passed the initial antitumor screening test, as well as an in vitro cell culture test against cancer cells in amounts less than 4 mcg/ml. This was reconfirmed by a European research group who published similar reports in 2003 and 2004.
Kim, S., et al. "A new, iterative strategy for the synthesis of unsymmetrical polyynes: application to the total synthesis of 15,16-dihydrominquartynoic acid." Org Lett. 2004 Sep 30;6(20):3601-4.
Gung, B., et al. "Total synthesis of (-)-minquartynoic acid: an anti-cancer, anti-HIV natural product." Org Lett. 2002 Jul 25;4(15):2517-9.
Marles, R. J., et al. "Isolation of a novel cytotoxic polyacetylene from a traditional anthelmintic medicinal plant, Minquartia guianensis." J. Nat. Prod. 1989; 52(2): 261-266.
Ito, A., et al. "Cytotoxic polyacetylenes from the twigs of Ochanostachys amentacea." J. Nat. Prod. 2001; 64(2): 246-248.
Farnsworth, N. R., et al. "Isolation of a novel cytotoxic polyacetylene from a traditional anthelmintic medicinal plant: Minquartia guianensis Aubl. (Olacaceae). Abstr International Congress on Natural Products Research Park City, UT July 17-21 1988: Abstr-22 .
Quignard, E. L. J., et al. "Screening of plants found in Amazonas state for lethality towards brine shrimp." Acta Amazonica. 2003; 33(1): 93-104.
Quignard, E. L. J., et al. "Medium lethal concentrations of amazonian plant extracts in the brine shrimp assay." Pharmaceutical Biology. 2004; 42(3): 253-257.
Rasmussem, H. B., et al. "Absolute configuration and antiprotozoal activity of minquartynoic acid." J. Nat. Prod. 2000; 63(9): 1295-1296.

Antiparasitic Actions (malaria & leishmania):
Ruiz, L., et al. "Plants used by native Amazonian groups from the Nanay River (Peru) for the treatment of malaria." J Ethnopharmacol. 2011 Jan 27;133(2):917-21.
Gachet, M., et al. "Assessment of anti-protozoal activity of plants traditionally used in Ecuador in the treatment of leishmaniasis." J Ethnopharmacol. 2010 Mar 2;128(1):184-97.
Rasmussem, H. B., et al. "Absolute configuration and antiprotozoal activity of minquartynoic acid." J. Nat. Prod. 2000; 63(9): 1295-1296.

Antimicrobial Actions (virus & bacteria):
The main bioactive chemical in Huacapu bark is a lipid called minquartynoic acid. This plant chemical has been the subject of research; in 2001, a research group reported minquartynoic acid demonstrated effective antiviral actions against the HIV virus at as little as 2.2 mcg/ml. In a study published in 1996 researchers reported that a methanol extract of huacapu bark demonstrated antibacterial actions against two antibiotic-resistant strains of Staphylo-coccus, as well as Pseudomonas and Bacillus.
Gung, B., et al. "Total synthesis of (-)-minquartynoic acid: an anti-cancer, anti-HIV natural product." Org Lett. 2002 Jul 25;4(15):2517-9.
Rashid, M. A., et al. "Absolute stereochemistry and anti-HIV activity of minquartynoic acid, a polyacetylene from Ochanostachys amentacea." Nat Prod. Lett. 2001; 15(1): 21-26 .
El-Seedi, H. R., et al. "Triterpenes, lichexanthone and an acetylenic acid from Minquartia guianensis." Phytochemistry. 1994; 35 (5): 1297-1299.
Jovel, E. M., et al. "An ethnobotanical study of the traditional medicine of the Mestizo people of Suni Mirano, Loreto, Peru." J. Ethnopharmacol. 1996; 53: 149-156.


* The statements contained herein have not been evaluated
by the Food and Drug Administration. This product is
not intended to treat, cure, mitigate or prevent any disease.
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Last updated 12-31-2012