Picao Preto (Bidens pilosa) Powder - Picao Preto (Bidens pilosa) Powder - Picao Preto (Bidens pilosa Picão Preto Powder

Bidens pilosa

This product is no longer sold by Raintree Nutrition, Inc. See the main product page for more information why. Try doing a google search or see the rainforest products page to find other companies selling rainforest herbal supplements or rainforest plants if you want to make this rainforest formula yourself.

Picão preto, one of South America's well-known medicinal plants, is widely used for numerous conditions.* Many of its indigenous uses for inflammation, hypertension, cancer, ulcers, diabetes and infections of all kinds are being validated and verified by modern research.* To see pictures of picão preto, For more information about picão preto (Bidens pilosa), please refer to the Database File for Picão Preto in the Tropical Plant Database. click here.

Traditional Uses:* as a broad-spectrum antimicrobial for various internal and external infections (caused by virus, bacteria, yeast, fungi); to tone, balance, strengthen, protect, and detoxify the liver; for arthritis, rheumatism, and other inflammatory conditions; for diabetes; for stomach ulcers and digestive disorders

Suggested Use: This plant is best prepared as a decoction. Use one teaspoon of powder for each cup of water. Bring to a boil and gently boil in a covered pot for 20 minutes. Allow to cool and settle for 10 minutes and strain warm liquid into a cup (leaving the settled powder in the bottom of the pan). It is traditionally taken in 1 cup dosages, 2-3 twice daily. For more complete instructions on preparing herbal decoctions, see the Methods for Preparing Herbal Remedies Page.

Contraindications:
  • Not to be used during pregnancy or while breast-feeding.
  • This plant contains several coumarin derivatives.Those on coumadin blood thinning medications should use with caution and monitor these possible effects.
  • Picão preto contains a small amount of naturally-occurring caffeine; it should not be used by those who are allergic or sensitive to caffeine.
  • This plant has been documented to lower blood sugar levels in several animal studies. It is probably contraindicated in persons with hypoglycemia and people with diabetes should monitor their blood sugar levels accordingly.
  • Picão preto has been documented with hypotensive activity in several animal studies. It is probably contraindicated for persons with low blood pressure.
Drug Interactions: None reported, however, this plant might increase or enhance the effect of high blood pressure, blood thinning and antidiabetic drugs.





Third-Party Published Research*

All available third-party research on picão preto can be found at PUBMED. A partial listing of published research on picão preto is shown below:

Anticancerous & Antileukemic Actions:
Wu, J., et al. "Investigation of the extracts from Bidens pilosa Linn. var. radiata Sch. Bip. for antioxidant activities and cytotoxicity against human tumor cells." J Nat Med. 2013 Jan;67(1):17-26.
Nakama, S., et al. "Anti-adult T-cell leukemia effects of Bidens pilosa." Int J Oncol. 2011 Apr;38(4):1163-73.
Kumari, P., et al. "A promising anticancer and antimalarial component from the leaves of Bidens pilosa." Planta Med. 2009 Jan;75(1):59-61.
Kviencinskin, M., et al. "Study of the antitumor potential of Bidens pilosa (Asteraceae) used in Brazilian folk medicine." J Ethnopharmacol. 2008 Apr 17;117(1):69-75.
Wu, L., et al. "A novel polyacetylene significantly inhibits angiogenesis and promotes apoptosis in human endothelial cells through activation of the CDK inhibitors and caspase-7." Planta Med. 2007 Jun;73(7):655-61.
Sundararajan, P., et al. "Studies of anticancer and antipyretic activity of Bidens pilosa whole plant." Afr. Health Sci. 2006 Mar; 6(1): 27-30.
Wu, L. W., et al. “Polyacetylenes function as anti-angiogenic agents.” Pharm. Res. 2004; 21(11): 2112-9.
Chang, J. S., et al. "Antileukemic activity of Bidens pilosa L. var. minor (Blume) Sherff and Houttuynia cordata Thunb." Am. J. Chin. Med. 2001; 29(2): 303-12.
Wang, J., et al. "Inhibition of 5 compounds from Bidens bipinnata on leukemia cells in vitro." Zhong Yao Cai. 1997; 20(5): 247-9.
Gupta, M. P., et al. “Screening of Panamanian medicinal plants for brine shrimp toxicity, crown gall tumor inhibition, cytotoxicity and DNA intercalation.” Int. J. Pharmacog. 1996; 34(1): 19–27.
Alvarez, L., et al. “Bioactive polyacetylenes from Bidens pilosa.” Planta Med. 1996; 62(4): 355–57.
Wat, C. K., et al. “Ultraviolet-mediated cytotoxic activity of phenylheptatriyne from Bidens pilosa L.” J. Nat. Prod. 1979; 42(1): 103–11.

Immunomodulator, Antioxidant & Liver Protective Actions:
Wu, J., et al. "Investigation of the extracts from Bidens pilosa Linn. var. radiata Sch. Bip. for antioxidant activities and cytotoxicity against human tumor cells." J Nat Med. 2013 Jan;67(1):17-26.
Kviecinski, M., et al. "Brazilian Bidens pilosa Linné yields fraction containing quercetin-derived flavonoid with free radical scavenger activity and hepatoprotective effects." Libyan J Med. 2011 Jan 18;6.
Adedapo, A., et al. "Comparison of the nutritive value and biological activities of the acetone, methanol and water extracts of the leaves of Bidens pilosa and Chenopodium album." Acta Pol Pharm. 2011 Jan-Feb;68(1):83-92.
Horiuchi, M., et al. "Effects of Bidens pilosa L. var. radiata Scherff on experimental gastric lesion." J Nat Med. 2010 Oct;64(4):430-5.
Suzigan, M., et al. "An acqueous extract of Bidens pilosa L. protects liver from cholestatic disease: experimental study in young rats." Acta Cir Bras. 2009 Sep-Oct;24(5):347-52.
Yuan, L., et al. "Protective effects of total flavonoids of Bidens pilosa L. (TFB) on animal liver injury and liver fibrosis." J Ethnopharmacol. 2008 Mar 28;116(3):539-46.
Chang, C., et al. "Cytopiloyne, a polyacetylenic glucoside, prevents type 1 diabetes in nonobese diabetic mice." J Immunol. 2007 Jun 1;178(11):6984-93.
Chang, S., et al. "Flavonoids, centaurein and centaureidin, from Bidens pilosa, stimulate IFN-gamma expression." J Ethnopharmacol. 2007 Jun 13;112(2):232-6.
Chiang, Y., et al. "Cytopiloyne, a novel polyacetylenic glucoside from Bidens pilosa, functions as a T helper cell modulator." J Ethnopharmacol. 2007 Apr 4;110(3):532-8.
Yang, H. L., et al. "Protection from oxidative damage using Bidens pilosa extracts in normal human erythrocytes." Food Chem. Toxicol. 2006 Sep; 44(9): 1513-21.
Abajo, C., et al. “In vitro study of the antioxidant and immunomodulatory activity of aqueous infusion of Bidens pilosa.” J. Ethnopharmacol. 2004 Aug; 93(2-3): 319-23.
Chang, S. L., et al. “Polyacetylenic compounds and butanol fraction from Bidens pilosa can modulate the differentiation of helper T cells and prevent autoimmune diabetes in non-obese diabetic mice.” Planta Med. 2004; 70(11):1045-51.
Chiang, Y. M., et al. “Metabolite profiling and chemopreventive bioactivity of plant extracts from Bidens pilosa.” J. Ethnopharmacol. 2004 Dec; 95(2-3): 409-19.
Usami, E., et al. “Assessment of antioxidant activity of natural compound by water- and lipid-soluble antioxidant factor” Yakugaku Zasshi. 2004; 124(11): 847-50.
Chin, H. W., et al. “The hepatoprotective effects of Taiwan folk medicine ‘ham-hong-chho’ in rats.” Am. J. Chin. Med. 1996; 24(3–4): 231–40.

Anti-inflammatory, Muscle Relaxant, & Pain-Relieving Actions:
Yoshida, N., et al. "Bidens pilosa suppresses interleukin-1beta-induced cyclooxygenase-2 expression through the inhibition of mitogen activated protein kinases phosphorylation in normal human dermal fibroblasts." J. Dermatol. 2006; 33(10): 676-83.
Chiang, Y. M., et al. “Ethyl caffeate suppresses NF-kappaB activation and its downstream inflammatory mediators, iNOS, COX-2, and PGE2 in vitro or in mouse skin.” Br. J. Pharmacol. 2005 Oct; 146(3): 352-63.
Nguelefack, T. B., et al. “Relaxant effects of the neutral extract of the leaves of Bidens pilosa Linn on isolated rat vascular smooth muscle.” Phytother. Res. 2005; 19(3): 207-10.
Chang, C. L., et al. "The distinct effects of a butanol fraction of Bidens pilosa plant extract on the development of Th1-mediated diabetes and Th2-mediated air way inflammation in mice." J. Biomed. Sci. 2005; 12(1): 79-89.
Pereira, R. L., et al. “Immunosuppressive and anti-inflammatory effects of methanolic extract and the polyacetylene isolated from Bidens pilosa L.” Immunopharmacology. 1999; 43(1): 31–7.
Jager, A. K., et al. “Screening of Zulu medicinal plants for prostaglandin-synthesis inhibitors” J. Ethnopharmacol. 1996; 52(2): 95–100.
Chih, H. W., et al. “Anti-inflammatory activity of Taiwan folk medicine ‘ham-hong-chho’ in rats.” Am. J. Chin. Med. 1995; 23(3–4): 273–78.

Antimicrobial Actions:
Nakama, S., et al. "Efficacy of Bidens pilosa Extract against Herpes Simplex Virus Infection In Vitro and In Vivo." Evid Based Complement Alternat Med. 2012;2012:413453.
Adedapo, A., et al. "Comparison of the nutritive value and biological activities of the acetone, methanol and water extracts of the leaves of Bidens pilosa and Chenopodium album." Acta Pol Pharm. 2011 Jan-Feb;68(1):83-92.
Tobinaga, S., et al. "Isolation and identification of a potent antimalarial and antibacterial polyacetylene from Bidens pilosa." Planta Med. 2009 May;75(6):624-8.
Rojas, J. J., et al. "Screening for antimicrobial activity of ten medicinal plants used in Colombian folkloric medicine: A possible alternative in the treatment of non-nosocomial infections." BMC Complement. Altern. Med. 2006 Feb; 6(1): 2.
Khan, M. R., et al. “Anti-microbial activity of Bidens pilosa, Bischofia javanica, Elmerillia papuana and Sigesbekia orientalis.” Fitoterapia. 2001; 72(6): 662–65.
Chariandy, C. M., et al. “Screening of medicinal plants from Trinidad and Tobago for antimicrobial and insecticidal properties.” J. Ethnopharmacol. 1999; 64(3): 265–70.
Rabe, T. “Antibacterial activity of South African plants used for medicinal purposes.” J. Ethnopharmacol. 1997; 56(1): 81–7.
van Puyvelde, L., et al. “In vitro inhibition of mycobacteria by Rwandese medicinal plants.” Phytother. Res. 1994; 8(2): 65–9.
Desta, B. “Ethiopian traditional herbal drugs. Part II: Antimicrobial activity of 63 medicinal plants.” J. Ethnopharmacol. 1993; 39(2): 129–39.
Sarg, T. M., et al. “Constituents and biological activity of Bidens pilosa l grown in Egypt.” Acta. Pharm. Hung. 1991; 61(6): 317–23.
Geissberger, P., et al. “Constituents of Bidens pilosa L.: do the components found so far explain the use of this plant in traditional medicine?” Acta Trop. 1991; 48(4): 251–61.
Hudson, J. B., et al. “Investigation of the antiviral action of the photoactive compound phenylheptatriyne.” Photochem. Photobiol. 1986; 43(1): 27–33.
Boily, Y., et al. “Screening of medicinal plants of Rwanda (central Africa) for antimicrobial activity.” J. Ethnopharmacol. 1986; 16(1): 1–13.
Bondarenko, A. S., et al. “The antimicrobial properties of the polyacetylene antibiotic phenylheptatriyne.” Mikrobiol. Zh. 1985; 47(2): 81–3.
Hudson, J. B., et al. “Nature of the interaction between the photoactive compound phenylheptatriyne and animal viruses.” Photochem. Photobiol. 1982; 36(2): 181–85.
Arnason, T., et al. “Photosensitization of Escherichia coli and Saccharomyces cerevisiae by phenylheptatriyne from Bidens pilosa.” Can. J. Microbiol. 1980; 26(6): 698–705.

Antidiabetic & Hypoglycemic Actions:
Kumar, C., et al. "The first total synthesis of cytopiloyne, an anti-diabetic, polyacetylenic glucoside." Chemistry. 2011 Jul 25;17(31):8696-703.
Chien, S., et al. "Anti-diabetic properties of three common Bidens pilosa variants in Taiwan." Phytochemistry. 2009 Jul;70(10):1246-54.
Hsu, Y., et al. "Anti-hyperglycemic effects and mechanism of Bidens pilosa water extract." J Ethnopharmacol. 2009 Mar 18;122(2):379-83.
Chang, C., et al. "Cytopiloyne, a polyacetylenic glucoside, prevents type 1 diabetes in nonobese diabetic mice." J Immunol. 2007 Jun 1;178(11):6984-93.
Lans, C. A. "Ethnomedicines used in Trinidad and Tobago for urinary problems and diabetes mellitus." J. Ethnobiol. Ethnomedicine. 2006 Oct; 2: 45.
Chang, C.L., et al. “The distinct effects of a butanol fraction of Bidens pilosa plant extract on the development of Th1-mediated diabetes and Th2-mediated air way inflammation in mice.” J. Biomed. Sci. 2005; 12(1): 79-89.
Alarcon-Aguilar, F. J., et al. “Investigation on the hypoglycaemic effects of extracts of four Mexican medicinal plants in normal and alloxan-diabetic mice.” Phytother. Res. 2002; 16(4): 383–86.
Ubillas, R. P. “Antihyperglycemic acetylenic glucosides from Bidens pilosa.” Planta Med. 2000; 66(1): 82–3.
Alarcon-Aguilara, F. J., et al. “Study of the anti-hyperglycemic effect of plants used as antidiabetics.” J. Ethnopharmacol. 1998; 61(2): 101–10.
Perez, R. M., et al. “A study of the hypoglycemic effect of some Mexican plants.” J. Ethnopharmacol. 1984; 12(3): 253–62.

Hypotensive Actions:
Dimo, T., et al. “Leaf methanol extract of Bidens pilosa prevents and attenuates the hypertension induced by high-fructose diet in Wister rats.” J. Ethnopharmacol. 2002; 83(3): 183–91.
Dimo, T., et al. “Effects of the aqueous and methylene chloride extracts of Bidens pilosa leaf on fructose-hypertensive rats.” J. Ethnopharmacol. 2001; 76(3): 215–21.
Dimo, T., et al. “Hypotensive effects of a methanol extract from Bidens pilosa Linn. on hypertensive rats.” C. R. Acad. Sci. Paris 1999; 322(4): 323–29.
Dimo, T., et al. “Effects of leaf aqueous extract of Bidens pilosa (Asteraceae) on KCL- and norepinephrine-induced contractions of rat aorta.” J. Ethnopharmacol. 1998; 60(2): 179–82.

Anti-ulcer & Anti-diarrhea Actions:
Horiuchi, M., et al. "Effects of Bidens pilosa L. var. radiata Scherff on experimental gastric lesion." J Nat Med. 2010 Oct;64(4):430-5.
Lans, C. "Comparison of plants used for skin and stomach problems in Trinidad and Tobago with Asian ethnomedicine." J. Ethnobiol. Ethnomedicine. 2007 Jan; 3(1): 3.
Atta, A. H., et al. "Evaluation of some medicinal plant extracts for antidiarrhoeal activity." Phytother. Res. 2005 Jun; 19(6): 481-5.
Tan, P. V., et al. “Effects of methanol, cyclohexane and methylene chloride extracts of Bidens pilosa on various gastric ulcer models in rats.” J. Ethnopharmacol. 2000; 73(3): 415–21.
Alvarez, A., et al. “Gastric antisecretory and antiulcer activities of an ethanolic extract of Bidens pilosa L. var. radiata Schult. Bip.” J. Ethnopharmacol. 1999; 67(3): 333–40.
Avalos, A. A., et al. “Influence of extracts from leaves and stem of Bidens pilosa on experimental ulcerogenesis in rats.” Rev. Cubana Farm. 1984; 18(2): 143–50.

Anti-allery & Antihistamine Actions:
Matsumoto, T., et al. "Effects of Bidens pilosa L. var. radiata SCHERFF treated with enzyme on histamine-induced contraction of guinea pig ileum and on histamine release from mast cells." J Smooth Muscle Res. 2009 Jun;45(2-3):75-86.
Wang, N. L., et al. "Two neolignan glucosides and antihistamine release activities from Bidens parviflora WILLD." Chem. Pharm. Bull. 2006 Aug; 54(8): 1190-2.

Fever-Reducing Actions:
Sundararajan, P., et al. "Studies of anticancer and antipyretic activity of Bidens pilosa whole plant." Afr. Health Sci. 2006 Mar; 6(1): 27-30.

Antimalarial & Antileishmanial Actions:
Garcia, M., et al. "Screening of medicinal plants against Leishmania amazonensis." Pharm Biol. 2010 Sep;48(9):1053-8.
Tobinaga, S., et al. "Isolation and identification of a potent antimalarial and antibacterial polyacetylene from Bidens pilosa." Planta Med. 2009 May;75(6):624-8.
Kumari, P., et al. "A promising anticancer and antimalarial component from the leaves of Bidens pilosa." Planta Med. 2009 Jan;75(1):59-61.
Oliveira, F.Q., et al. “New evidences of antimalarial activity of Bidens pilosa roots extract correlated with polyacetylene and flavonoids.” J. Ethnopharmacol. 2004 Jul; 93(1): 39-42.
Andrade-Neto, V. F., et al. “Antimalarial activity of Bidens pilosa L. (Asteraceae) ethanol extracts from wild plants collected in various localities or plants cultivated in humus soil.” Phytother. Res. 2004; 18(8): 634-9.
Krettli, A. U., et al. “The search for new antimalarial drugs from plants used to treat fever and malaria or plants randomly selected; a review.” Mem. Inst. Oswaldo Cruz 2001; 96(8): 1033–42.
Krettli, A. U., et al. “New antimalarial drugs: A search based on plants used in popular medicine to treat fever and malaria.” Folha. Med. 2001; 120(2): 119–26.
Brandao, M. G. L., et al. “Antimalarial activity of extracts and fractions from Bidens pilosa and other Bidens species (Asteraceae) correlated with the presence of acetylene and flavonoid compound.” Eur. J. Pharmacol. 1997; 57(2): 131–38.

Actions on Uterine Contractions:
Nikolajsen, T., et al. "Uterine contraction induced by Tanzanian plants used to induce abortion." J Ethnopharmacol. 2011 Sep 1;137(1):921-5.
Frida, L., et al. "In vivo and in vitro effects of Bidens pilosa L. (Asteraceae) leaf aqueous and ethanol extracts on primed-oestrogenized rat uterine muscle." Afr J Tradit Complement Altern Med. 2007 Oct 27;5(1):79-91.

Toxicity Studies:
Costa Rde, J., et al. "In vitro study of mutagenic potential of Bidens pilosa Linné and Mikania glomerata Sprengel using the comet and micronucleus assays." J Ethnopharmacol. 2008 Jun 19;118(1):86-93.




* The statements contained herein have not been evaluated
by the Food and Drug Administration. This product is
not intended to treat, cure, mitigate or prevent any disease.
Please refer to our Conditions of Use for this web site and product.





© Copyrighted 1996 to present by Leslie Taylor, Milam County, TX 77857.
All rights reserved. Please read the Conditions of Use, and Copyright Statement
for this web page and web site.
Last updated 12-29-2012